Don’t ‘cock up’ your Class Q Permitted Development Rights
Awareness of the interaction between Class Q Permitted Development Rights and the Permitted Development Rights that allow agricultural development

Don’t ‘cock up’ your Class Q Permitted Development Rights

“We have come across a several cases recently where farmers were not aware of the interaction between Class Q Permitted Development Rights (PDRs) and the PDRs that allow agricultural development under Class A(a) of Part 6 of Schedule 2 of the GPDO”, reports Brian Dinnis of Acorn Rural Property Consultants.

Most farmers will be familiar with Class A(a) PDRs which allows “the carrying out on agricultural land comprised in an agricultural unit of 5 hectares or more in area of works for the erection, extension or alteration of a building”.

“It is a condition of the GPDO that Class Q PDRs do not apply where development under Class A(a) has been carried out on the established agricultural unit i) since 20th March 2013; or ii) where development under Class Q begins after 20th March 2023, during the period which is 10 years before the date of development under Class Q begins”, explains Dinnis.

“What is important not to overlook is that it is also a condition of the GPDO that Class A(a) PDRs do not apply on an established agricultural unit where development under Class Q has been carried out within a period of 10 years ending with the date on which development under Class A(a) begins”, adds Dinnis.

Dinnis says that the interaction between Class Q PDRs and Class A(a) PDRS is extremely important and any farmer considering putting up a new agricultural building or extending or altering an existing building should be aware that using PDRs to obtain planning consent for that development would prevent the use of Class Q PDRs for a period of 10 years. Farmers should also be aware that making use of Class Q PDRs to obtain planning consent for change of use of agricultural buildings to residential use will also prevent them from making use of Class A(a) PDRs for a period of 10 years.

“The answer for farmers who are considering putting up new or altering or extending existing agricultural buildings within the next 10 years is to look at the options for making full use of the Class Q PDRs first and then to make a full planning application for their agricultural buildings”, advises Dinnis.

For advice on rural planning matters please contact Brian Dinnis at Acorn Rural Property Consultants on 01884 214052 or at briandinnis@acornrpc.co.uk.  Brian is a Chartered Surveyor and an Associate member of the Royal Town Planning Institute.

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